February, 1926, Sunday 7

Finish my exercises early, and hurry down to Stockleys’. ((William P. Stockley (1859-1943), professor of English at University College Cork from 1905-1931. He was born in Dublin, studied at Trinity College with Douglas Hyde, taught at the universities of Ottawa and New Brunswick before returning…

Continue reading →

March, 1926, Wednesday 10

Did not go to school, but went to Imperial Hotel to arrange everything for concert. I was there from 9.30 till 2 o’clock. Only one man came with cartloads of chairs, and I had to haul them up with a rope from the yard below…

Continue reading →

March, 1926, Friday 26

Last day. Got marks of the rest of the exams. In Latin 320/400, the next being Charlie O’Connor with 230; in Irish 214/400, 3rd place in class; and in maths 258/600, very poor, though poor old Pa did not see two of my sums which…

Continue reading →

March, 1926, Saturday 27

Made out a plan of morning work for the holidays. I will do 2 hours school work, and 1½ hours piano every morning if I can. After breakfast (I get up at 8.30) I tidied up all my books and things in the dining-room, then…

Continue reading →

April, 1926, Wednesday 28

Got a card from Father Pat saying that he had a private audience with the Pope, and is having a glorious time. – Went to match to-day at which there was a huge crowd. Of course, we were beaten by about 5 goals, though our…

Continue reading →

July, 1926, Thursday 15

Went shopping with Mám in the morning, and we got some cold things for dinner. Then I settled the kitchen and dining-room for about 2 hrs as all my studying and reading books were in Cappoquin. – Yesterday we saw in the paper that at…

Continue reading →

August, 1926, Monday 30

Read in paper that there was a great monarchist demonstration in Bavaria, and a reunion of all officers and veterans in the old regime. So lives monarchy in Bavaria! It must have been an inspiring sight to see the glorious uniforms and grandees of pre-war…

Continue reading →

December, 1926, Tuesday 7

All night, Mám was very, very bilious, but the greatest part of the pain went by morning. Páp went to Bantry for his lesson-giving by the 9 [bus]. I went to school, but rushed back at 12 to see how Mám was. She was much…

Continue reading →